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Iquest Alang Madan Kulang trek a grand success

The grand trek to Alang Madan and kulang in the sahyadris was a great success ,    the year end of 2014 and the entry into 2015 was done  in a very special Iquest way,

we shall let our pictures do the speaking

For any inquiries  on this trek please cfontact us at  Sunand Sampath   +91 9448476683    email sunand@iquestindia.com

 

All set to climb Kulang  as the sun starts to set

All set to climb Kulang as the sun starts to set

The base village ... warm simple family

The base village … warm simple family

TRIP LEADER SUNAND SAMPATH

TRIP LEADER SUNAND SAMPATH

Alang Madan kulang ( L to R )

Alang Madan kulang ( L to R )

sweet pain of success

sweet pain of success

Day one morning  of Jan 1st 2015

Day one morning of Jan 1st 2015

feeling the mountain

feeling the mountain

Not an easy climb

Not an easy climb

yes that cave is 60 feet high

yes that cave is 60 feet high

technical climb to summit Alang

technical climb to summit Alang

inside the cave

inside the cave

towards alang

towards alang

Descending Madan

Descending Madan

Sometimes this nature gets one emotional

Sometimes this nature gets one emotional

absailing

absailing

Rappelling down the pitch

Rappelling down the pitch

Descending Madan

Descending Madan

Scary narrow descent

Scary narrow descent

Heart in Mouth

Heart in Mouth

Hmmmm

Hmmmm

All team  going good

All team going good

Inside the cave  ... there is energy

Inside the cave … there is energy

dusk and we almost done with climbing

dusk and we almost done with climbing

Climb on

Climb on

Any stronger then ever

Any stronger then ever

Akash on the move

Akash on the move

At the base of Madan

At the base of Madan

Hemant ... anchored

Hemant … anchored

a small wait before one gets to climb up this pitch , its a technical climb ahead

a small wait before one gets to climb up this pitch , its a technical climb ahead

IMG_2022 IMG_2001

Towards Madan

Towards Madan

Resting time

Resting time

And enjoy the nature Beauty

And enjoy the nature Beauty

Mind and body in synch

Mind and body in synch

Narrow trail

Narrow trail

IMG_1893

descend with greater caution here

descend with greater caution here

One at a time descend

One at a time descend

Descend

Descend

Descend the steep narrow Kulang top

Descend the steep narrow Kulang top

The team

The team

Sunrise ... warmth , nature

Sunrise … warmth , nature

There is water .... Vikas  and his smile  always ...

There is water …. Vikas and his smile always …

Water tanks made  long ago on Kulang

Water tanks made long ago on Kulang

Adding Life to the trek Akash

Adding Life to the trek Akash

 

One of the best treks in the Sahyadris … recommended  highly for thrill seekers…..

 

never venture in rainy season

never venture without experienced people along with you ..

good planing and preperation needed …..

 

Blog by Sunand Sampath  the proud Trip Leader

 

 

 

 

How does “Children’s Camp” helps Children???

Hi!!!

Have you been to any camp before ???

If  you’re then, you will not be surprised when you hear about the advantages of the camp. Experiencing life at camp yourself as a child, you know the profound optimistic effects that still matter to you as an adult, and you also know that you want the same thing for your own kids:-)!!!

But if you didn’t go to camp as a child, you may not realize just how good the experience is for children. You may not know why so many parents are committed to sending their kids to camp. So here is a list of the most important reasons to send your kids to camp.

 

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At camp, children Expertise, Experience and Explore To New Things Like;

1.      Children spend their day being physically active !

As children spend so much time these days inside and mostly sitting down, it provides a wonderful opportunity to move. Running, swimming, jumping, hiking, climbing!

2.       Camp Enables to experience success and become more confident !

Camp helps children build self-confidence and self-esteem by removing the kind of academic, athletic and social competition that shapes their lives at school. With its non-competitive activities and diverse opportunities to succeed, camp life is a real boost for young people. There’s accomplishment every day.

3.      Camp helps conquer fears & Gain resiliency !

The kind of encouragement and nurture kids receive at camp makes it a great environment to endure setbacks, try new (and thereby maybe a little frightening) things, and see that improvement comes when you give something another try.

4.       Camp is real Unplugged  from technology!

When kids take a break from TV, cell phones, and the Internet, they rediscover their creative powers and engage the real world— real people, real activities, and real emotions. They realize, there’s always plenty to do.

5.      Camp  help inDeveloping  life-long skills !

Camps provide the right instruction, equipment and facilities for kids to enhance their sports abilities, their artistic talents, and their adventure skills. The sheer variety of activities offered at camp, makes it easy for kids to discover and develop what they like to do.

6.       Camp helps kids to Grow more independent !

Camp is the perfect place for kids to practice making decisions for themselves without parents and teachers guiding every move. Managing their daily choices in the safe, caring environment of camp, children welcome this as a freedom to blossom in new directions.

7.      Have free time for unstructured play !

Free from the overly-structured, overly-scheduled routines of home and school, life at camp gives children much needed free time to just play. It is a slice of carefree living where kids can relax, laugh, and be silly all day long.

8.      Camp builds teamwork!

Coming to camp means joining a close-knit community where everyone must agree to cooperate and respect each other. When they live in a cabin with others, kids share chores, resolve disagreements, and see firsthand the importance of sincere communication.

9.      Reconnect with nature !

It’s a wonderful antidote to “nature deficit disorder,” to the narrow experience of modern indoor life. Outdoor experience enriches kid’s perception of the world and supports healthy child development.

10. camp creates friendships!.

Camp is the place where kids make their very best friends. Free from the social expectations pressuring them at school, It encourages kids to relax and make friends easily. All the fun at camp draws everyone together— singing, laughing, talking, playing, doing almost everything together  “Everyday.”

See?

Camp is “Great”!!!

So wait no more to give an unique experience to your child.

 

 Contact  now:

Contact   :  Sunand Sampath

Mobile    :   + 91 9448476683

Email       :   contact@iquestindia.com

Website :    www.iquestindia.com

Expedition Behavior

Helping a fellow student get through a rough day by carrying some of their weight, turning back due to bad weather, bringing your tent mate a hot drink, or keeping a smile on your face during five days of torrential rains are just a few examples of Expedition Behavior in action.

“Expedition Behavior” has evolved into a catchphrase—and an even shorter acronym, “EB”—that carries with it endless implications. In 1965 they were just two words Paul used to explain a suite of behavioral concepts, as simple as using the word “teamwork” on a football squad. Today, expedition behavior stands as an integral part of the NOLS curriculum, describing behaviors that help a group cooperate and attain goals.

expedition_behavior_01_xl

Expedition Behavior

  • Serve the mission and goals of the group.
  • Be as concerned for others as you are for yourself.
  • Treat everyone with dignity and respect.
  • Support leadership and growth in everyone.
  • Respect the cultures you contact.
  • Be kind and open-hearted.
  • Do your share and stay organized.
  • Help others, but don’t routinely do their work.
  • Model integrity by being honest and accountable.
  • Admit and correct your mistakes.

A good expedition team is like a powerful, finely tuned marriage. Members cook meals together, face challenges together and finally go to bed together. A bad expedition, on the other hand, is an ugly, embarrassing thing characterized by bickering, filth, frustration and crispy macaroni.

 

Nearly all bad expeditions  have one thing in common: poor expedition behavior (EB). This is true even if team members follow the stated rules, such as No Standing on the Rope, No Kerosene in the Food, No Soap in the River, No Raccoons in the Tent, and Keep Your Goddam Ice Axe Out of My Eye.

 

Unfortunately, too many rules of expedition behavior remain unspoken. Some leaders seem to assume that their team members already have strong and generous characters like their own. But judging from a few of the campers we’ve encountered, more rules ought to be spelled out. Here are ten of them.

 

RULE #1

Get the hell out of bed.

 Suppose your tent mates get up early to fetch water and fire up the stove while you lie comatose in your sleeping bag. As they run an extensive equipment check, coil ropes and fix your breakfast, they hear you start to snore. Last night you were their buddy; now they’re listing things about you that make them want to spit. They will devise cruel punishments for you. You have earned them. Had you gotten out of bed, nobody would have had to suffer.

RULE #2

 Do not be cheerful before breakfast.

 Some people wake up perky and happy as fluffy bunny rabbits. They put stress on those who wake up mean as rabid wolverines. Exhortations such as “Rise and shine, sugar!” and “Greet the dawn, pumpkin!” have been known to provoke pungent expletives from wolverine types. These curses, in turn, may offend fluffy bunny types. Indeed, they are issued with the sincere intent to offend. Thus, the day begins with flying fur and hurt feelings. The best early-morning EB is simple: Be quiet.

 

RULE #3

 Do not complain. About anything. Ever.

It’s ten below zero, visibility is four inches and wind-driven hailstones are embedded in your face. Must you mention it? Do you think your friends haven’t noticed the weather? Make a suggestion. Tell a joke. Lead a prayer. Do not lodge a complaint. Yes, your pack weighs 87 pounds and your cheap backpack straps are actually cutting into your flesh. Were you promised a personal Sherpa? Did somebody cheat you out of a mule team? If you can’t carry your weight, get a motor home.

 

RULE #

4 Learn to cook at least one thing right.

 One expedition trick is so old that it is no longer amusing: on the first cooking assignment, the clever cook prepares a dish that resembles, say, Burnt Sock en le Sauce Toxique. The cook hopes to be relieved permanently from cooking duties. This is the childish approach to a problem that’s been with us since people first started throwing lizards on the fire. Tricks are not a part of a team spirit. If you don’t like to cook, offer to wash dishes and prepare the one thing you do know how to cook. Even if it’s only tea. Remember that talented camp cooks sometimes get invited to join major expeditions in Nepal, all expenses paid.

 

RULE #5

 Either A) shampoo, or B) do not remove your hat for any reason.

After a week or so on the trail, without shampooing, hair forms angry clumps and wads. These leave the person beneath looking like an escapee from a mental ward. Such an appearance could shake a team’s confidence in your judgment. If you can’t shampoo, pull a wool hat down over your ears and leave it there, night and day, for the entire expedition.

 

RULE #6

Do not ask if anybody’s seen your stuff.

Experienced adventures have systems for organizing their gear. They rarely leave it strewn around camp or lying back on the trail. One of the most damning things you can do is ask your teammates if they’ve seen the tent poles you thought you packed 20 miles ago. Even in the unlikely event you get home alive, you will not be invited on the next trip. Should you ever leave the tent poles 20 miles away, do not ask if anybody’s seen them. Simply announce, with a good-natured chuckle, that you are about to set off in the dark on a 40-mile hike to retrieve them, and that you are sorry. It’s unprofessional to lose your spoon or your toothbrush. If something like that happens, don’t mention it to anyone.

 

RULE #7

Never ask where you are.

 If you want to know where you are, look at the map. Try to figure it out yourself. If you’re still confused, feel free to discuss the identity of landmarks around you and how they correspond to the cartography. If you A) suspect that a mistake has been made; and B) have experience interpreting topographical maps, and C) are certain that your group leader is a novice or on drugs, speak up. Otherwise, follow the group like sheep.

 

RULE #8

 Always carry more than your fair share.

 When the trip is over, would you rather be remembered as a rock or a wuss? Keep in mind that a pound or two of extra weight in your pack won’t make your back hurt any more than it already does. In any given group of flatlanders, somebody is bound to bicker about weight. When an argument begins, take the extra weight yourself. Then shake your head and gaze with pity upon the slothful one. This is the mature response to childish behavior. On the trail that day, during a break, load the tenderfoot’s pack with 20 pounds of gravel.

 

RULE #9

Do not get sunburned.

Sunburn is not only painful and unattractive—it’s also and obvious sign of inexperience. Most greenhorns wait too long before applying sunscreen. Once you’ve burned on an expedition, you may not have a chance to get out of the sun. Then the burn gets burned, skin peels away, blisters sprout on the already swollen lips. You get the idea. Wear zinc oxide. You can see exactly where and how thickly it’s applied and it gives you just about 100% protection. It does get on your sunglasses, all over your clothes and in your mouth. But that’s OK. Unlike sunshine, zinc oxide is non-toxic.

 

RULE #10

 Do not get killed.

Suppose you make the summit , chain-smoking Gilanes and carrying the complete works of Hemingway in hardcover. Pretty macho, huh? Suppose now that you take a vertical detour down a crevasse and never make it back to camp. Would you still qualify as a hero? And would it matter? Nobody’s going to run any fingers through your new chest hair. The worst thing to have on your outdoor resume is a list of the possible locations of your body. Besides, your demise might distract your team members from enjoying what’s left of their vacations.

 

All expedition behavior really flows from this one principle: Think of your team, the beautiful machine, first. You are merely a cog in that machine. If you have something to prove, forget about joining an expedition. Your team will never have more than one member.

The IQUEST ADVENTURES – ANNAPURNA CIRCUIT TREK (NEPAL)

ATC

Annapurna circuit trek …. !!!!

This trek takes you through distinct regional scenery of rivers, flora, fauna and above all – mountains.    There are four regions that are passed through on the trek; Lamjung, Manang, Mustang and Myagdi.

Lamjung and Myagdi of the lower elevations are both predominantly Hindu and with lush green subtropical valleys with villages and terraced farming. Manang and Mustang are of the higher elevations and are predominantly Tibetan Buddhist.

The trek goes counter-clockwise reaches its summit in Thorung La (pass) at the height of 5416m, or 17,769 feet.  The route goes past the  mountains,      passing through the world’s deepest gorge in between those two 8,000-plus meter peaks. Poon Hill, at the end of the trek, affords views of those two mountains, as well as South Annapurna and Macchupucchre, the “Fishtail Mountain.”

The trek also goes through Buddhist villages and Hindu holy sites, most notably the village of Muktinath, a holy site for both Buddhists and Hindus, and Braga, one of the oldest monasteries in the region. From Dharapani to
Kagbeni you will be walking the Annapurna section of The Great Himalaya Trail, a long distance trekking route that connects Nepal from East to West.
To Be led by a Highly experienced Mountaineering Leader and supported by well experienced Guides and Friendly Staff…!

Dates : 5th April to 20th April 2014 ,KTM to KTM.
Type of Trek : Tea House.
Highest point:  17873 ft/5416 mts.
Focus : Villages, monasteries, wildlife, high passes, and dramatic landscape.
Grade : Physical Challenge, Hard trek overall, so physical fitness is recommended.

Day to Day Itinerary:-

Day 01: 5th April 2014: Arrival in Kathmandu
Upon arriving in Kathmandu (Tribhuvan International Airport), a representative will meet you and help you transfer to your hotel by private bus. Enjoy a free evening to explore Kathmandu and recover from your jet-lag. Meet the our trip leader during a short pre-tour briefing before dinner.

Day 02: 6th April: Sightseeing of Kathmandu Valley and preparation for the trip. Travel to Pokhara proceed to syangje and stay.

Day 03: 7th April: Trek from Syange to Dharapani [1,960m/6,430ft]: 7-8 hrs. A leisurely trekking pace takes us into the Manang district with its fields of barley, rice, potato and pine forests. We pass the village of Kodo and will overnight in Dharapani.

Day 04: 8th April: Trek from Dharapani to Chame [2,710m/8,891ft]: 5-6 hrs. On the way to Chame we climb a few steep, forested ridges and are treated by some of the most sensational mountain views: Lamjung Himal, Annapurna II, and Annapurna IV (7,525m/24,688ft). At our destination a few small hot springs bring relief to our taxed muscles.

Day 05: 9th April: Trek from Chame to Pisang [3,300m/10824ft]: 5-6 hrs.
Today we trek higher along a steep and narrow, densely forest path that leads to a rock face that soars 1500m/4,920 ft above the river. We reach at Pisang finally.

Day 06: 10th April: Trek from Upper Pisang to Manang [3,500m/11,482ft]: 6-7 hrs. Out of the two routes to choose, we select the upper one (through Upper Pisang and Geru) where the sceneries are unmatched. Majestic peaks tower all around us are Annapurna, Pisang peak, and several others. As we trek higher the landscape and vegetation change with the colder and dryer environment. It’s not all hard work though, since we will visit the Barge monastery (largest in the district of Manang).

Day 07: 11th April: Trek from Manang: Acclimatization Day
To allow our body chemistry to change, adapt to the lower levels of oxygen at altitude, this will be an acclimatization day. We will take a few short walks to higher ground. Great destinations are the Bhojo Gompa, Gangapurna Lake, the Himalayan Rescue Association and even the small old, monastery village of Vraga. This day is important since the next two are challenging with a rapid gain in altitude.

Day 8: 12th April: Trek from Manag to Yak Kharka ,3,110m/13,484ft]: 3-4 hrs.  We climb out of the Marshyangdi Valley toward Jarsang Khola and Ghunsa. We pass a few pastures, a patch of juniper trees, and the flat mud roofs. After crossing a small river, we pass an ancient old Mani wall (religious carvings on stone slabs) before entering the small village of Yak Kharka.

Day 9: 13th April: Trek from Yak Kharka to Thorong Phedi [4,600m/15,092ft]: 3-4 hrs.  Thorong Pedi is close to the foot of the pass, Thorong La. This ‘trekker/climber’ village caters to the needs of these adventures souls. Some people hike higher to make the “pass-day” easier and risk contracting Altitude Sickness. We stop here to avoid this and potentially get a better night’s sleep.

Day 10: 14th April: Trek from Thorong Phedi to Muktinath [3,800/12,467ft]: 7-8 hrs. Thorong La (5,416 m/17,769 ft), an unforgettable experience, is clearly the climax of our Annapurna Circuit trek. It is in our grasp today. Yes, we will be huffing and puffing, and at the same time exulting in the experience; our own human performance and the unimaginable majesty of this place that few Westerners see. We reach Muktinath with the setting sun. Muktinath hosts a Vishnu temple and a Buddhist Monastery and is often referred to as an example of the religions harmony in Nepal.

Day 11: 15th April: Trek from Muktinath to Tatopani [1,200m/3937ft]: 6-8 hrs. Today, we drive along a plateau above the Kali Gandaki – world`s deepest gorge. We will be using the local private jeep of bus to Ghasa and then change another vehicle to Tatopani. The road is gravel and unfortunately rough and dusty. At Tatopani another treat awaits us, and everyone is anxious to relax their weary muscles in one of the hot spring pools.

Day 12: 16th April: Trek from Tatopani to Ghorepani [2,850m/9,350ft].: 7-8 hrs. The trek to Ghorepani takes us past the Pun Magar villages of Ghara and Sikha and their terraced farmlands, through Phalate and Chitre, and through beautiful rhododendron, birch, and magnolia stands. The surrounding peaks look wonderful, almost ominous, as they tower above.

Day 13: 17th April: Trek from Ghorepani to Poon Hill to Nayapul and then drive to Pokhara. And stay
An early ascent of Poon Hill (3,210m. /10,531ft) takes us to the top to witness a spectacular moment in time: sunrise over the whole Annapurna and Dhaulagiri massifs. We then return back to our lodge for the breakfast. And then, we trek downhill to Nayapul via Ulleri and Birethanti. We drive to Pokhara from Nayapul, which take approx. an hour and half.

Day 14: 18th April Buffer Day 1
Day 15 : 19th April Buffer Day 2
Day 16 : 20th April: Final Departure from Kathmandu

Note:-

  • Cost :40000/- INR
  • Last Date for Registration : 15th March 2014                                                 [Registration through an advance payment of 50% of the total charges , Balance to be paid before 15th March 2014]
  • Age Group: 15 and above
  • Minimum number of participants : 5 nos.
  • Contact for registration:-
  • Sunand Sampath ( Expedition Coordinator )
  • Email contact@iquestindia.com phone +91 80 40930357 ( 15:00 to 19:00 hrs on week days )
  • Mobil: 9448476683

Cost Includes:-

  • Highly experienced Leaders, High Altitude Guides.
  • Hotels when in city, during the trek in tents on sharing basis.
  • Food :3 Veg meals a day while trekking.
  • Certificates and expedition t-shirts.
  • Flight to and fro Pokhara
  • 3 night accommodation in Kathmandu in non star hotel.
  • 2 Night Accommodation in Pokhara non star (without meals)

Cost Excludes:-

  • All the personal expenses like drinks, tips etc.
  • Cost of any form of insurance, rescue, evacuation, hospitalization, etc.
  • Travel fare up to KTM and Back (iQuest can assist in getting reservations for travel).
  • Any Insurance. Any item apart from that indicated in the itinerary.
  • Sightseeing and other charges in Kathmandu.
  • Meals in Kathmandu and in Pokhara
  • Any Temple entry fee

Cancellation Charges:-

  • 25% of the total charges of the actual cost incurred , whichever is higher if cancelled before 15th March 2014.
  • 50% of the total charges If cancelled between 16th March and 25th March 2014.
  • 75% of the total charges if cancelled between 26th March and 31st March 2014.
  • 100% charges if cancelled on or after 1st April 2014 , No refunds will be made if the participant has to return back at any point of the programme or does not attend the programme due to any reason what-so-ever .

KINDLY NOTE:-

In case of circumstance out of our control like, natural calamities, local law and order situation,etc.,which may result in change in itinerary, additional booking of accommdation,transport,logistic etc., causing an increase in expenses, and also in case of any fuel price hike .The additional cost thus incurred shall be borne by the participant.